Enforcing Lien Rights in Utah Through a Construction Lien Foreclosure Lawsuit

Posted in Blog, Commercial Litigation, Construction Law, Real Estate Law by

By Joseph G. Ballstaedt 801-365-1021 [email protected] As I have explained earlier, liens are automatically created when a worker, contractor, subcontractor, supplier, or other person or entity provides construction services on real property. Although nothing more is required to create this lien, the lien claimant quickly loses the lien forever if he doesn’t take certain steps Read More

Preserving Lien Rights in Utah Through the Notice of Construction Lien

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By Joseph G. Ballstaedt 801-365-1021 [email protected] Liens are automatically created when a person provides construction services on a piece of real property. The lien is an encumbrance that attaches to the owner’s interest in the property, and all that the lien claimant needs to do to create the lien is provide the construction services. Nothing Read More

How Credit Applications Protect Utah Suppliers

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By Joseph G. Ballstaedt 801-365-1021 [email protected] Most Utah suppliers provide equipment, materials, supplies, and other goods to general contractors, subcontractors, and sometimes other suppliers on an ongoing basis. Depending on the nature of the business relationship, each purchase from the supplier might be made in one of many different ways— ranging from an email request, Read More

The Preliminary Notice: The First Step in Preserving Lien Rights in Utah

Posted in Blog, Commercial Litigation, Construction Law, Real Estate Law by 1 Comment

By Joseph G. Ballstaedt 801-365-1021 [email protected] A construction lien—sometimes called a mechanic’s lien—is automatically created when a worker, contractor, subcontractor, supplier, or other entity in Utah provides work, services, or improvements on or for a specific piece of real property. (For simplicity in this post, we’ll refer to this as “construction work.”) A lien attaches Read More

Best Practices in Keeping Accounts Receivable from Default

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By Kevin M. Bischoff 801-365-1018 [email protected] Many businesses allow their customers to purchase goods and services on issued credit. Rather than requiring cash up front, the business will ultimately allow the customer to pick up the goods or acquire said services without paying first. Instead, the business will invoice the customer after the fact, and Read More

Not All Unenforceable Construction Lien Claims in Utah Are Wrongful Liens

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By Joseph G. Ballstaedt 801-365-1021 [email protected] A lien on real property (i.e. land and buildings) is a claim against this property for the payment of money. A notice of lien is generally a document that is recorded with a county recorder’s office in Utah that gives notice to the public that this piece of property Read More

Enhanced Penalties to Utah Contractors Who Fail to Pay Their Subcontractors and Suppliers

Posted in Construction Law by

By Joseph G. Ballstaedt 801-365-1021 [email protected] When a contractor fails to pay a subcontractor or supplier, the contractor takes a risky path. Even if the contractor doesn’t pay the subcontractor because he himself hasn’t been paid by the owner, it certainly isn’t good for business. Subcontractors and suppliers may, of course, refuse to engage in Read More

Resolving a Contract Dispute in Utah Through Accord and Satisfaction

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By Joseph G. Ballstaedt 801-365-1021 [email protected] Unfortunately, not all contracts sail smoothly without dispute. Often times, one party breaches the contract—or there is at least a claim of a breach—and the two parties duke it out, and the conflict can be both time-consuming and expensive. There is a common saying that “a bird in the Read More

Mediation: Anything You Say CANNOT Be Used Against You in Court

Posted in Business Organizations, Construction Law, Transportation Law by

By Joseph G. Ballstaedt 801-365-1021 [email protected] Business A claims that Business B breached a contract. A wonderful business relationship has soured, a lawsuit has erupted, and the parties are on the brink of spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on litigation. Conscious of these costs, however, the two businesses agree to mediate. Sure enough, the Read More